Cracking Enigma’s Code

Written by Yitz Fink, Product Expert at Loom Systems

Wars are not just won by those in the field, but by those who support them and provide them the proper intelligence.

It’s a known fact, that between each war, is the “war between wars”. This refers to in military terms the time where each side is collecting intel, whether human, signal intelligence, targets and a whole plethora of information that will allow a strategical advantage to each side. This information is also used to deploy diplomacy to try and avoid the wars to begin with, if they can and should be avoided.

In the 2014 Blockbuster “The Imitation Game” we learn about the true story of how Alan Turing helped the Allies, and specifically Britain, by building a machine that would be able to crack the Enigma Machine the Germans were using to encrypt their signal intelligence. This would ultimately  give the advantage to the allies, who were able to understand all of the signals the Nazi’s were able to send to each other.

Alan Turing in
Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing, the British mathematician and code breaker, in “The Imitation Game”. Jack English/Weinstrin

Alan Turing is widely considered to be the father of modern day computers, not to mention artificial intelligence.

Now let’s take a second and think about what he did. The British intelligence services were employing thousands of people, trying to crack codes and ciphers. Modern day intelligence services do the same, because if you are able to crack the other sides communications, there is no element of surprise. If you know what the other side is doing, you can prepare, defend, and take the offensive.

Humans are amazing machines. We have the ability to come to really difficult decisions, while taking into account both the logical and emotional aspects of each side. Our faults lie in our ability to process that data.

The same is true for IT and Security teams. The last thing we want to think of is Continuity management, disaster recovery, and Business contingency. This is because that means that we are in a post mortem phase. We want to be able to avoid the disaster to begin with, and not worry about how to pick up the pieces afterwards and where to go from there. Our whole mindset as IT Directors and CIO’s is to build a withstanding infrastructure that will allow our businesses to continue to work.

Stop begging your systems to work, Become proactive and make them work!

Our lives within IT are constant battles. Trying to win small battles, put out small fires. When we aren’t fighting those battles, we are thinking about how to improve our infrastructure or improve our end users user experience. A big challenge we face is that we have difficulties foreseeing a lot of issues that come up, and our ability to process machine data that can give us insight to those issues are like enigma. They are practically cryptic.

What we need is a smart, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence that will Analyze Logs and machine data, while offering us the root cause and giving us a resolution.

We need to take Alan Turing’s Machine to the next level. To employ an Artificial Intelligence that will allow us to process the enormous amounts of data that we currently don’t know what to do with.

Great Britain only started to win the war once they had the know-how to go on the initiative. The way we can win our wars, and be proactive in our IT environments, is if we have the know-how to understand all the data at our feet.

We are tasked with defending our organization’s digital business. Let’s take the next step in that digital transformation.

2 thoughts on “Cracking Enigma’s Code

  1. This is interesting, do you suppose digital transformation processes and AI solutions will actually impact and assist winning wars nowadays, where the encryption technologies are far more complexed and are based on algorithms no man can decipher?

    Like

  2. Hi D. Brown,

    Thats a Great question!

    I think that AI is becoming more prevalent in IT ecosystems nowadays. Just like you wouldn’t expect me to understand a book written in swahili, you can’t expect everyone to understand codes written in computer language.

    There is always someone who can crack the code. It may take a day or a year, but codes were meant to be broken. Humans will always take longer and we should be embracing AI to make our lives easier.

    Make sense?

    Yitz

    Like

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